Tag Archives: Asian

The Miracle Man

by Momar Visaya/AJPress
FLUSHING MEADOWS – Father Fernando Suarez has been called a lot of things: priest, healer, miracle worker, servant of God. The healing priest, a chemical engineer by profession, is also an avid tennis fan.
For two days that he was in New York City last week, Fr. Suarez dropped by the Billie Jean King Tennis Center to catch a couple of tennis games, including the exciting match between 8th seed Andy Roddick and upcoming Latvian hotshot Ernests Gulbis.

Just before the third round match Sunday, Aug. 31 between third seed Novak Djokovic from Serbia and Croatia’s Marin Cilic, Fr. Suarez sat down with the Asian Journal for a light chat just outside the famed Arthur Ashe Stadium.

A self-confessed Rafael Nadal fan, Fr. Suarez said that he tries to play tennis regularly, or when his schedules would allow. “Tennis is a good way to release stress and it is also a very good sport. Apart from that, I pray,” he said.

For two days that he was in New York City last week, Fr. Suarez dropped by the Billie Jean King Tennis Center to catch a couple of tennis games, including the exciting match between 8th seed Andy Roddick and upcoming Latvian hotshot Ernests Gulbis.

Just before the third round match Sunday, Aug. 31 between third seed Novak Djokovic from Serbia and Croatia’s Marin Cilic, Fr. Suarez sat down with the Asian Journal for a light chat just outside the famed Arthur Ashe Stadium.

A self-confessed Rafael Nadal fan, Fr. Suarez said that he tries to play tennis regularly, or when his schedules would allow. “Tennis is a good way to release stress and it is also a very good sport. Apart from that, I pray,” he said.

Global Healing Center

Fr. Suarez also shared that starting this September, he will already be based for good in Batangas City, where he will, among other things, oversee the construction of a sacred global healing center at Montemaria or “mountain of Mary”.

The center at Montemaria will house the tallest statue of Mary in the world that will stand 101 meters (33 stories) high upon completion and will serve as an apostolic and evangelization center for pilgrims wanting to experience a deeper personal relationship with God.

The Oratory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Montemaria will include a Rosary Garden, Stations of the Cross, Eucharistic Adoration Chapel, Saint Joseph Chapel, Divine Mercy Chapel, House of Mary, House of Joseph, Scala Santa, Infant Jesus Chapel, and retreat houses that will serve as a way station for pilgrims, complete with board and lodging, souvenir shops, a conference center and an international center for the poor.

Montemaria is an ambitious project that seeks to create an 18-hectare haven for pilgrims and a place for prayer dedicated to Mary, Mother of the Poor. The megashrine is expected to be finished in about five years and the statue of Our Lady of the Poor will stand taller than the Statue of Liberty here in New York and the Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.

There have been written reports that in June 1981, six children in the little town of Medjugorje received apparitions from the “Queen of Peace” where in one of them, the Philippines was mentioned as a global spiritual center.

A true Marian devotee, Fr. Suarez said he felt his love for the Virgin Mary when he was around 2 to 3 years old. 

Coming Home

This will be a homecoming of sorts for the healing priest since he was born in Butong in the town of Taal, Batangas in 1967. He went to Adamson University to finish his degree in chemical engineering and worked for an oil company in Batangas for five years before moving to Canada where he was based since 1995.

In 1997 he joined the Companions of the Cross religious community of priests and seminarians, founded by Rev. Robert Bedard in 1985 in Ottawa, Canada, and Fr. Suarez was ordained to the priesthood in 2002.

Fr. Suarez began noticing his gift of healing two decades earlier, when he was only 16 years old. Outside the Quiapo church, the then fresh high school graduate saw an old crippled woman. He asked her to pray with him and he felt her bones growing. The young man got scared, and for 20 years, he kept this secret.

Being a healing priest has propelled him to a celebrity status, which has its pros and cons and Fr. Suarez said he is mindful of both.

“Marami kang natutulungan, maraming bumabalik sa simbahan. Nagkakaroon ng conversion, ng healing. Nagkakaroon ng hope ang mga tao. On the other hand, you live under the microscope, lahat ng ikinikilos mo, napapansin. Hindi mo rin naman mapi-please lahat ng tao. Pinababayaan ko na lang yun,” he said.
 
“I never ever thought na aabot sa level na ito yung paniniwala ng mga tao sa akin. I did not even consider it was possible before pero nangyari eh,” he shared.

From the very beginning, Fr. Suarez said that the calling was there, “I just did not have enough courage to pursue it. I struggled to understand this unusual gift.”

Believing

“As far as I know, marami pa rin sa ating mga Pilipino ang believers, lalo na sa ministry ko. Karamihan sa mga maysakit can’t help but be believers kasi pag nangangailangan na ang tao, wala na silang ibang mapupuntahan kundi ang Diyos din,” Fr. Suarez explained.

Early this year, Fr. Suarez had a healing mass in Los Angeles attended by thousands of people at the L.A. Sports Arena. It was said to be the biggest healing mass the priest has ever done in the United States.

Fr. Suarez gets really busy during ministry and healing masses. “Napakaraming maysakit na tumatawag at humihingi ng tulong. Sana lang mapagbigyan ko silang lahat,” the soft-spoken priest said.

Before he embarks on every healing mass, Fr. Suarez said he prepares by saying a personal prayer. “I compose myself and I go to confession. Nililinis ko ang sarili ko to make sure na wala akong galit, hinanakit o guilt sa katawan,” he shared.

There are already plans for more healing masses in different U.S. cities but he said that there are things to be ironed out before anything is finalized.

Between now and the time he flies to the Philippines to stay there for good, Fr. Suarez will be holding healing masses in Ottawa and Vancouver in Canada.

A true believer from the start, Fr. Suarez hopes to inspire more people as he continues his quest to spread God’s word around the world through healing masses, retreats and missions.

Fr. Suarez also shared that starting this September, he will already be based for good in Batangas City, where he will, among other things, oversee the construction of a sacred global healing center at Montemaria or “mountain of Mary”.

The center at Montemaria will house the tallest statue of Mary in the world that will stand 101 meters (33 stories) high upon completion and will serve as an apostolic and evangelization center for pilgrims wanting to experience a deeper personal relationship with God.

The Oratory of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Montemaria will include a Rosary Garden, Stations of the Cross, Eucharistic Adoration Chapel, Saint Joseph Chapel, Divine Mercy Chapel, House of Mary, House of Joseph, Scala Santa, Infant Jesus Chapel, and retreat houses that will serve as a way station for pilgrims, complete with board and lodging, souvenir shops, a conference center and an international center for the poor.

Montemaria is an ambitious project that seeks to create an 18-hectare haven for pilgrims and a place for prayer dedicated to Mary, Mother of the Poor. The megashrine is expected to be finished in about five years and the statue of Our Lady of the Poor will stand taller than the Statue of Liberty here in New York and the Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro.

There have been written reports that in June 1981, six children in the little town of Medjugorje received apparitions from the “Queen of Peace” where in one of them, the Philippines was mentioned as a global spiritual center.

A true Marian devotee, Fr. Suarez said he felt his love for the Virgin Mary when he was around 2 to 3 years old.

Coming Home

This will be a homecoming of sorts for the healing priest since he was born in Butong in the town of Taal, Batangas in 1967. He went to Adamson University to finish his degree in chemical engineering and worked for an oil company in Batangas for five years before moving to Canada where he was based since 1995.

In 1997 he joined the Companions of the Cross religious community of priests and seminarians, founded by Rev. Robert Bedard in 1985 in Ottawa, Canada, and Fr. Suarez was ordained to the priesthood in 2002.

Fr. Suarez began noticing his gift of healing two decades earlier, when he was only 16 years old. Outside the Quiapo church, the then fresh high school graduate saw an old crippled woman. He asked her to pray with him and he felt her bones growing. The young man got scared, and for 20 years, he kept this secret.

Being a healing priest has propelled him to a celebrity status, which has its pros and cons and Fr. Suarez said he is mindful of both.

“Marami kang natutulungan, maraming bumabalik sa simbahan. Nagkakaroon ng conversion, ng healing. Nagkakaroon ng hope ang mga tao. On the other hand, you live under the microscope, lahat ng ikinikilos mo, napapansin. Hindi mo rin naman mapi-please lahat ng tao. Pinababayaan ko na lang yun,” he said.

“I never ever thought na aabot sa level na ito yung paniniwala ng mga tao sa akin. I did not even consider it was possible before pero nangyari eh,” he shared.

From the very beginning, Fr. Suarez said that the calling was there, “I just did not have enough courage to pursue it. I struggled to understand this unusual gift.”  (www.asianjournal.com)

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They’re Here! InvAsian

by Malou Liwanag-Aguilar/AJPress

LAS VEGAS – In the past years, the growth of the Asian populations has rapidly change. In California alone, the number of Asians has the largest, reaching 4.8 million in July 2004 and the largest numerical increase of 123,000 since July 2003, according to the US Census Bureau.

But the wave of Asian migration has turn to a surprising twist, as growing numbers of Asian Americans are beginning to leave from areas that have long been their main gateways — California and Washington. In a report by Steve Marcus for USA Today, it stated that “Asian Americans are moving to spots in the West they hope will produce better lifestyles.” The aralso explained the reasons – crushing home prices, poor schools, jammed freeways and persistent crime. These factors have sent millions of other Californians to pack their bags and move to the West, namely Las Vegas and Phoenix.

A growth in business and the community

According to the Census Bureau’s 2007 estimate, the number of Asians and Pacific Islanders in Nevada jumped 174 percent in the 1990s and 67 percent this decade. They now make up about 8.2 percent of the 2.6 million population.

Another proof on how big the Asian community has grown is the rapid development of Las Vegas’ Chinatown. Less than three blocks long 10 years ago, Chinatown now stretches almost four miles along Spring Mountain Boulevard. “Although it’s officially called Chinatown, it’s really ‘Asiatown’ said John Fukuda, founding president of the Asian Real Estate Association of America in USA Today. The association just opened its Las Vegas chapter last year.

Other visible signs of growth in the Asian American community are apparent – the construction of Asia Town Center, a 180,000 square foot shopping center and real estate agents are now offering prospective buyers with “fly and buys” for Californians to check out properties.

However, the Filipinos, not the Chinese or Japanese are the largest contingent, constituting more than 40 percent of the group’s local population.

This surge of Filipino immigration to Nevada began later than any other states. Mostly living in the Las Vegas Clark County area, the Filipinos have built a community that is centered to serve the growing population. It has Little Manila, accommodating Philippine favorites like Goldilocks Bakeshop, a mini mall-type Seafood City supermarket, housing other Filipino businesses like Jollibee, Chow King, Red Ribbon, Valerio’s and Philippine National Bank. It is also now a focal point of Filipino tourists and immigrants and is served by Philippine Airlines, which provides easy access when traveling between the Philippines and Nevada.

Development and progress in the area translates into more employment for the locals, something that is welcomed by the both job-seekers and employers.

The lights and sounds are indeed luring more people – not just Asians – from other states. Soon enough, the population will be more diverse – something that will make Las Vegas more interesting aside from its hotels and casinos.

(www.asianjournal.com)

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